Disease Images: Classical Swine Fever

Additional resources for Classical Swine Fever

Classical Swine Fever: Pig, kidney. The cortex contains multiple petechiae and pale infarcts surrounded by hemorrhage.
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Description:
Pig, kidney. The cortex contains multiple petechiae and pale infarcts surrounded by hemorrhage.

Credit: PIADC
Photo ID: CSF_001
0086
   
Classical Swine Fever: Pig, kidney. The cortex contains multiple petechiae and pale infarcts surrounded by hemorrhage.
Enlarge Photo

Description:
Pig, kidney. The cortex contains multiple petechiae and pale infarcts surrounded by hemorrhage.

Credit: PIADC
Photo ID: CSF_002
0087
   
Classical Swine Fever: Pig, kidney. There are numerous disseminated cortical petechiae ("turkey egg kidney").
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Description:
Pig, kidney. There are numerous disseminated cortical petechiae ("turkey egg kidney").

Credit: PIADC
Photo ID: CSF_003
0088
   
Classical Swine Fever: Pig, kidney. The cortex contains disseminated petechiae. Calyces are moderately dilated (hydronephrosis) and also contain hemorrhages.
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Description:
Pig, kidney. The cortex contains disseminated petechiae. Calyces are moderately dilated (hydronephrosis) and also contain hemorrhages.

Credit: PIADC
Photo ID: CSF_004
0089
   
Classical Swine Fever: Pig, retropharyngeal lymph node. The lymph node is markedly enlarged and hemorrhagic; the tonsil contains multiple poorly demarcated hemorrhages.
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Description:
Pig, retropharyngeal lymph node. The lymph node is markedly enlarged and hemorrhagic; the tonsil contains multiple poorly demarcated hemorrhages.

Credit: PIADC
Photo ID: CSF_005
0090
   
Classical Swine Fever: Pig, kidney. There is extensive hemorrhage on the cortical surface.
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Description:
Pig, kidney. There is extensive hemorrhage on the cortical surface.

Credit: PIADC
Photo ID: CSF_006
0091
   
Classical Swine Fever: Pig, inguinal lymph node. There are petechial and peripheral (medullary sinus) hemorrhages.
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Description:
Pig, inguinal lymph node. There are petechial and peripheral (medullary sinus) hemorrhages.

Credit: PIADC
Photo ID: CSF_007
0092
   
Classical Swine Fever: Pig, pharynx and larynx. There are coalescing foci of petechial hemorrhage (and necrosis) in the palatine tonsils and adjacent pharyngeal and laryngeal mucosa.
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Description:
Pig, pharynx and larynx. There are coalescing foci of petechial hemorrhage (and necrosis) in the palatine tonsils and adjacent pharyngeal and laryngeal mucosa.

Credit: Dr. W. Wajjwalku, Kasetsart University, Thailand
Photo ID: CSF_008
0093
   
Classical Swine Fever: Pig, lung. The cortex contains multiple petechiae and pale infarcts surrounded by hemorrhage.
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Description:
Pig, lung. The cortex contains multiple petechiae and pale infarcts surrounded by hemorrhage.

Credit: PIADC
Photo ID: CSF_009
0094
   
Classical Swine Fever: Pig, spleen. There are multiple coalescing, swollen, dark red infarcts along the margins.
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Description:
Pig, spleen. There are multiple coalescing, swollen, dark red infarcts along the margins.

Credit: PIADC
Photo ID: CSF_010
0095
   
Classical Swine Fever: Pig, tonsil. The epiglottis and the bisected palatine tonsil contain multiple tan foci of necrosis.
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Description:
Pig, tonsil. The epiglottis and the bisected palatine tonsil contain multiple tan foci of necrosis.

Credit: Dr. R. Panciera, Oklahoma State University, School of Veterinary Medicine, Noah's Arkive
Photo ID: CSF_011
0096
   
Classical Swine Fever: Porcine, colon. The mucosa is reddened and contains multiple discrete ("button") ulcers surrounded by zones of hemorrhage.
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Description:
Porcine, colon. The mucosa is reddened and contains multiple discrete ("button") ulcers surrounded by zones of hemorrhage.

Credit: Dr. R. Panciera, Oklahoma State University, School of Veterinary Medicine, Noah's Arkive
Photo ID: CSF_012
0097
   

To use images and associated descriptions contained on this website, please contact the CFSPH.

These images were annotated by Dr. Steve Sorden and Dr. Claire Andreasen and funding was provided by a USDA Higher Education Challenge Grant in collaboration with the Iowa State University Department of Veterinary Pathology, Center for Food Security and Public Health, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, and Plum Island Animal Disease Center.